The Best Way to Find Fish

The Best Way to Find Fish

Take it from the fish finder experts: there are WAY too many choices out there when it comes to fish finders. Don’t we all wish it was just so much easier to make the right choice? A choice that would continuously net us fish after fish after fish, and give us the least amount of hiccups possible?

It’s not too hard to choose the best fish finder for the money. In fact, here’s a dirty little secret: make the “money” part your deciding factor, and go from there! Let me explain: If you are having to ask this question, you are probably a recreational angler that wants to catch more fish, right? As easy as that! So first, you need to decide how much you are prepared to spend. You can find a fish finder for less than $100, and you can even find one for $2000!

For this price range, you are looking at a very basic fish finder that has a small, low-resolution black and white screen and no GPS. This means that the readings you will get will be rather cramped and possible even a little tough to interpret, since color screens generally show better results.

These guys will have a low power rating and a lower end transducer, which means the most depth you will get is about 100-150 feet. The readings will be good, but not fantastic. I’d recommend a fish finder in this range if you are just starting out as an angler and generally fish really shallow water from a small boat. Don’t expect to go too much into detail with structure, cover, and thermoclines.

Dogs and Kayaking

Lack of training directly translates to safety issues for all involved, even on the flattest of water. Some dogs take naturally to the water; some don’t. Some avoid it like the plague. If your dog does not have consistent, ready recall of basic commands, they aren’t ready to hit the water. Taking time to help your dog completely acclimate to the idea of being in the boat and the water opens up a lifetime of incredible memories! Patience, consistent and respectful training, and plenty of benign, non-water related exposure to your boat can often help most hydrophobic hounds enjoy boating.

Lack of training directly translates to safety issues for all involved, even on the flattest of water. Some dogs take naturally to the water; some don’t. Some avoid it like the plague. If your dog does not have consistent, ready recall of basic commands, they aren’t ready to hit the water. Taking time to help your dog completely acclimate to the idea of being in the boat and the water opens up a lifetime of incredible memories! Patience, consistent and respectful training, and plenty of benign, non-water related exposure to your boat can often help most hydrophobic hounds enjoy boating.

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